Burkhart

Burkhart

Not one of us can escape it. We are continually forced to make choices every waking moment; from the beginning of our rational life to its end. The only humans exempt are: 1. children before the age of reason (often referred to as the age of innocence); and 2. demented adults. So it is that you and I are held responsible for our actions — rightfully receiving merit and praise or fault and condemnation by what we choose to do each moment throughout our lives.

Our moral foundation is the steering wheel of our life, constantly prompting the question, “What should I choose to do here and now?”

Morality is A) SUBJECTIVE (our conscience) dictating to us what is right and wrong according to our understanding; or B) OBJECTIVE – God’s perfect, immutable everlasting truth; which none of us are ever able to perfectly attain, but ever seek by lifelong prayer and the study of theology.

The vast variations in religion — Christianity, Judaism, Muslim, and Hindus, with each within itself having many diversities — gives us some idea of the endless differences in each individual subjective conscience. Yet, the simplicity of seeing basic right from wrong is clearly and indelibly marked in every rational human being.

So it is that the whole human race is fundamentally united and agrees on what is moral and immoral behavior [“… that God’s law is written in their hearts…” Romans 2:15] There is a common denominator that unites the minds of all people, agreeing as to what is basically right and wrong.

Conscientious variance between us is usually caused by difference in religious instruction, but mostly by our way of life — cautious or careless moral behavior.

At any rate, all of us are ultimately judged (by God) according to our subjective conscience; compelled to follow or reject its directives. Virtue or sin is in the balance of our choices.

Following our conscience or countering our conscience is why we live; freely choosing what we understand to be right and good or choosing what is wrong and evil. We are constantly choosing to love or not love God and neighbor. So it is that we define who we are.

The allurements of any moment can entice us to counter our conscience — to sin. The only moment we can live is the present one. That moment of the present — the here and now — needs top priority. We cannot change our past and we can not live the future.

Frequently and devoutly may we say, “Our Father... lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.” [Matthew 5:13]

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