Burkhart

Burkhart

In 1788, the English started settling in Australia. This land, however, had already been inhabited centuries earlier by several isolated tribes. The English gave these tribes the title Aborigines.

In Australian jungles some of these aloof and isolated tribes continue to be identified as “Aborigines”. Their origin is prehistoric — prior to any recorded history. The ancestors of these tribes discovered this remote continent in the far southern hemisphere, when it was still connected to the prehistoric continent Sahul. The DNA of these Aborigines identifies that their ancestors were even earlier migrants from the geographic area of today’s India; an estimated 48,000 years ago!

The etymology of the word Aborigines is, “a people who are from the beginning”. All humanity, however, is from the beginning, so all of us might be so entitled. The actual genealogy of all of us has been enshrouded by countless centuries beyond historic records. The (DNA) of the Australian Aborigines enables us to make something of an educated guess of when and where on earth they had their origin.

We all throw our hands up facing the unfathomed historic depth of our own genealogy. The biblical account of the first man and woman does not give us a historical follow-up between them and us.

The roots of our origin, though buried in a murky multiple of centuries, are permanent and immutable; we can not change the past. Each of us as a helpless recipient is handed a prescription of ancestral genes.

In great contrast is our future. We enjoy the freedom to direct and focus our time and talent. We are all free to live as we elect — yet ever acknowledging a surround of earthly limitations.

Early in our lives we all find ourselves issuing restrictive prescriptions to give direction and productivity to our lives. To become a farmer, a plumber, a taxi driver or a medical doctor requires self-prescribed discipline, experience and education; establishing firm parameters for our time and talent. Without such self-directing of our lives, none of us would be employable or able to earn a living. We have all sought to answer, “What do you want to be when you grow up?

Although we tend to be set in our ways, we are all continually learning and therefore changing. We hand ourselves updated prescriptions regularly.

“Flying by the seat of our pants” is our lot in life — influenced subjectively by OUR pride (ego), OUR body (its desires and needs), OUR conscience (choosing our moral stance in life; determining our relationship with Our Maker and our neighbor) and OUR talent (what we can do).

How many times have we heard people say they were born with no talent? This is a lie and sometimes stated to avoid obligations. It reminds me of my being reared on a farm. Some farmers had great equipment, but failed productivity because they failed to develop skills in operating the equipment. Acknowledging and developing our unique personal skills is a primary life-long task. With rare exception, our ancestors endowed us well. We can choose to be our worst enemy, avoiding/denying ourselves; or to be our best at who we are. Celebrating our unique person with all gifts and limitations is a formula for enjoying life.

Our beginning is handed to us. Our destiny we hand ourselves.

React to this story:

0
0
0
0
0

Recommended for you