Kentucky Coalition Against Domestic Violence announces October as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

FRANKFORT — The Kentucky Coalition Against Domestic Violence announces October as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM). According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, one in four women and one in seven men across the United States have experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime. Nearly half of all women have experienced psychological aggression. But in Kentucky, the rates for physical violence and psychological violence experienced by women are higher than any other state in the nation.

Angela Yannelli, KCADV CEO shared that “Domestic violence and dating violence affect the lives of thousands of families across Kentucky every year, including our vulnerable children. Our member programs are working alongside community partners to develop trauma-informed interventions as well as innovative prevention programs to help survivors of domestic violence gain the tools they need to have safe and stable lives and homes for their family. This includes services such as rapid rehousing, microloans, matched savings accounts, and emergency funds in addition to life-saving shelter and supportive services. There should be no room for domestic violence in our state and in our homes.”

Founded in 1981, KCADV provides a strong voice on behalf of domestic violence victims and their children and administers $10.5 million in funds to the state's 15 domestic violence programs (serving all 120 Kentucky counties).

KCADV invites the community to join with the nation throughout the month of October to mourn for those whose lives were taken by domestic violence, celebrate the tremendous progress victim advocates have made over the years, and connect with one another with a true sense of unity to end domestic violence.

Scarcity of funding and resources poses challenges for survivors across Kentucky. While economic difficulty does not cause domestic violence, it can be a risk factor that makes it worse. At the same time, having fewer financial resources makes it harder for survivors to secure a safe place to live. For KCADV and its member programs, the struggle to keep the doors open is on-going especially during this time when state pension costs have escalated and there is no current feasible relief. According to the latest point in time survey conducted by the National Network to End Domestic Violence, Kentucky’s domestic violence programs were forced to eliminate 12 direct service staff in the prior year, meaning that there were fewer advocates to answer calls for help or provide needed services. In addition, there were 74 unmet requests for services in one day, of which 60 were for housing.

However, despite tremendous challenges, last year KCADV programs provided 4,525 survivors and their children with emergency shelter and transitional housing and provided nonresidential services to 22,388 survivors and their children.

During the month of October, KCADV invites you to raise awareness about domestic violence by wearing purple, liking and sharing KCADV on Facebook, and giving to make a difference in the lives of survivors. Donations can be made at kcadv.org.

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