TheTimesTribune.com, Corbin, KY

Homepage

December 28, 2012

A new role and new goals

CUE director Bentley returns to teaching next month

CORBIN — In her seven-and-a-half years as executive director of Corbin’s United Effort (CUE), Christina Bentley says she’s helped the non-profit community organization reach their goals. Now, she’s ready to help a new generation reach their goals as a teacher.

Bentley’s last day at CUE was last Friday. She spent much of that final day helping hundreds of children and families at the annual Southeast Kentucky Empty Stocking Fund Giveaway at Forest Bowling Lanes.

Her successor is Jason Hale, a Harlan County native who comes to CUE with what Bentley called “a considerable background in Frankfort with grant administration.”

Hale took over the reins as executive director last week.

In less than two weeks, Bentley will be an adjunct lecturer with Lincoln Memorial University, based in Harrogate, Tenn. She said she plans to teach at LMU’s campus at the Baptist Regional Medical Center in Corbin. Her first day as a college English teacher is Jan. 7.

Bentley formerly taught English at the University of Kentucky from 1999 to 2004. She returned to Corbin in May 2005, to take over the position at CUE. The semester after she joined Corbin’s United Effort, she also taught at EKU-Corbin.

“I found out that while I could do both jobs adequately, I couldn’t do them as well as I wanted to. So I put that on hold until I felt like my work at CUE was done,” said Bentley.

Now she feels that time has come. And there’s a reason why.

“Any organization is a living, breathing thing, if it’s healthy. And that means it has to grow and change. Not every leader is going to be good at every phase of that life cycle. At this point, I feel like I’ve finished. I do want to make it clear that there’s no conflict involved. I’ve been very happy with CUE, and the board’s been very happy with me. I reached my goals. I set out to do very specific things at Corbin’s United Effort, and I did those things,” Bentley noted.

Among the accomplishments she pointed out were an organization plan, a set of policies to go by, and a new home for CUE.

“When I started there, CUE was in a house on 18th Street, which we rented for $750 a month. Now, we’re at the Barbourville Street office, which is more centrally-located in town, closer to other services and more client-friendly. We had no written policies of any kind when I began. We had nothing. So we had to create policies, guidelines and criteria for clients and staff. The organization needed to be professionalized. And we needed to get the word out to people who needed to use our services about what we did.”

Bentley now feels the primary focus is to do more fundraising and grant work. Much of that came about from a city ordinance that started almost a year ago.

“When the smoking ban (in public places) went into effect last January, our fundraising took a big hit. We had bingo as a major fundraising tool, and this past year, the time came to diversify our fundraising.”

Bentley said it was time for Hale to succeed her, and that it was time for his knowledge and experience in grant writing to work for the organization.

Hale said Bentley’s talents and skills left a lasting mark on CUE.

“Christina was a really big help in my transition last week. She commands a lot of respect from the staff, and I could tell she’ll be greatly missed.”

Already, Bentley’s looking forward to the next phase of her life and career — a career she hopes will open the minds and imagination of those she touches.

“I like teaching. I was 26 when I started teaching at UK. And I really enjoy college students. Being a college student is an exercise in hope. For everybody, college was the last time you believed anything is possible. I had that feeling when I was a college student.”

But with less than 10 days to go before she returns to the classroom, Bentley said she hasn’t had much time to rest up before school is in session.

“Not yet. But seriously, I’m thinking I’ll turn off my mobile phone next week and stick it in a drawer.”

1
Text Only
Homepage
0726 thunderbolt for web.jpg

The soft whistle of a flute floated through the room as audience members listened in awe to tales of the Thunderbolt people. “This land that you’re now sitting on was that of Thunderbolt people,” said Thunderbolt descendant David Owens. Owens and Indian flute player Robert Mullinax stopped at the Laurel County Library Friday night to entertain with spoken legends, folk lore and tales of the bygone Thunderbolts. Audiences were captivated by stories passed down from the Thunderbolt of how things came to be. Tales about fire, pipes and Kentucky — just to name a few — were shared by Ownes over the course of an hour with Mullinax playing behind him.

  • Tales of the Thunderbolt

    The soft whistle of a flute floated through the room as audience members listened in awe to tales of the Thunderbolt people.

    July 27, 2014 1 Photo

Local News
Local Sports
0725 BARGER FOR WEB.jpg

Knox Central's Matthew Barger is expected to move from quarterback to wide out this season. Panther's head coach Scott Russell said he expects Barger to remain as the team's playmaker.

  • Ready to Reload

    Even though Knox Central head football coach Scottie Russell has seen the departure of two of the program’s best tailbacks due to graduation in the past two years, he isn’t concerned.

    July 25, 2014 1 Photo

  • Shelton was a hero by any definition

    The word hero is used a little too loosely for my taste these days.
    To be honest, it’s been used way too much for a long time and I’m just as guilty as the next guy.

    July 25, 2014

Editorials
Features
0708 Kelsey White Miss Ky.jpg

Kelsey White

  • Local woman vyes for Miss Kentucky crown

    A Williamsburg woman is among the 32 contestants representing local scholarship pageants from across the state who will vye for the title of Miss Kentucky 2014. 

    July 8, 2014 1 Photo

Letters
Entertainment
  • July’s jumpin’ in Downtown Corbin

    After Thursday’s fun, festivities and fireworks during the Independence Day Block Party, how do you top the month best known as the sizzling center of summer?

    July 7, 2014

Front page
Featured Ads
AP Video
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming 13 Struck by Lightning on Calif. Beach Baseball Hall of Famers Inducted Israel, Hamas Trade Fire Despite Truce in Gaza Italy's Nibali Set to Win First Tour De France Raw: Shipwrecked Concordia Completes Last Voyage Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge From Nest Raw: Massive Dust Storm Covers Phoenix 12-hour Cease-fire in Gaza Fighting Begins Raw: Bolivian Dancers Attempt to Break Record Raw: Israel, Palestine Supporters Rally in US Raw: Air Algerie Flight 5017 Wreckage Virginia Governor Tours Tornado Aftermath Judge Faces Heat Over Offer to Help Migrant Kids Kangaroo Goes Missing in Oklahoma More M17 Bodies Return, Sanctions on Russia Grow Raw: Deadly Tornado Hits Virginia Campground Ohio State Marching Band Chief Fired After Probe Raw: Big Rig Stuck in Illinois Swamp
Twitter Updates
Follow us on twitter
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Facebook