TheTimesTribune.com, Corbin, KY

July 1, 2009

Voice of Faith Magazine, Issue 2

Summer 2009


Page 1 Magazine Cover
Page 2 Kemper Home Furnishings
Page 3 Table of Contents
Page 4 Some Gave All
Page 5 Battle of a Lifetime
Page 6 Battle of a Lifetime cont.
Page 7 Battle of a Lifetime cont, Gatti's Pizza, Brookhaven Christian Books
Page 8 Yards of Paradise, Window World, Assured Medical Billing
Page 9 Yards of Paradise cont, Saint Joseph, Townsley Enterprises
Page 10 Creating the Fairy Tale
Page 11 Creating the Fairy Tale cont.
Page 12 The Amen & the Oh My
Page 13 Book & Movie Reviews
Page 14 Conforming your Character, Knox Co Chamber of Commerce
Page 15 Knox Funeral Home, Beacon Baptist Church, Cornerstone Christian School, Amish Furniture
Page 16 Chad's Hope
Page 17 Chad's Hope cont.
Page 18 The Adventures of Peanut
Page 19 Leo Jones & Son
Page 20 Little Lads Landing, Clear Creek Bible College, Kelly Burton
Page 21 Venture Cabs, Corbin Physical Therapy, Clayton Homes, Cumberland Baptist Institute
Page 22 The Potluck
Page 23 University of the Cumberlands, Oakdale Christian Academy, B&C; Landscaping
Page 24 London Farm Service
Page 25 London Farm Service cont.
Page 26 Abstinence: Choice or Command
Page 27 Abstinence: Choice or Command cont, Modest Apparel, East Kentucky Metal
Page 28 Bible Study
Page 29 Bible Study cont, Fabric World, Parkway Ministries, Waste Connections
Page 30 Unusual Witness for Christ
Page 31 First National Bank
Page 32 Tri-State Institute of Hair Design


“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me,” (Phillipians 4:13) is a daily mantra for many who strive to succeed in today’s society. However, for those individuals who struggle with the added burden of substance abuse/addiction, their ability to embrace this concept is probably a thing of the past. Fortunately, there are centers across the nation (and the world) that can help them rebuild and strengthen their hearts and minds, and Chad’s Hope Teen Challenge in Manchester is one of those facilities.

This facility emerged as a result of the community reaction to the level of recognized, drug-related issues in Clay County. In 2002, it was estimated that one (1) death per month in the county could be directly linked to drug involvement. Concerned citizens formed a committee (Christians for a Drug Free Clay County) in an attempt to draw needed attention to the situation. Congressman Hal Rogers viewed the resulting media coverage and began his own investigation that resulted in the creation of a task force (Operation UNITE) to target street level drug dealers by encouraging citizens to report any and all suspected illegal drug activity to the authorities.

Citizens embraced their newfound empowerment, and it soon became evident the local jail facilities could not house the number of offenders being brought to justice. Other options needed to be found. Through continual prayer and focused political involvement, grant funds were allocated and released to build a local treatment facility, which could focus on truly rehabilitating addicts and further protecting the community. This facility would be built on land donated by Charley and Virginia McWhorter, who had recently lost their beloved son, Chad, to a drug overdose. Chad’s Hope Center opened its doors in February 2008, ready to accommodate up to 52 men (ages 18 and up) in a residential, faith-based recovery center.

The Teen Challenge side of the equation was conceived in 1958 by Rev. David Wilkerson, whose mission was to create faith-based environments that rebuild lives devastated by addiction. Teen Challenge firmly believes, and results show, that an addict must establish a personal relationship with Jesus Christ if he wishes to find permanent freedom from bondage. Since its inception, Teen Challenge has grown to include over 1,000 centers around the world – 300 of which are in the US. In September 2008, this organization took over operation of the existing Chad’s Hope Center.

This particular recovery center has been very active as of late traveling around Southeastern Kentucky to share their message with local churches and community organizations. Through song and personal testimony, souls are bared to those who will listen. This openness fosters a better understanding of the pain of addiction, but also exhorts the joy of knowing Jesus Christ and living in his mercy through the ministry of Chad’s Hope Teen Challenge.

True recovery begins with a complete change in behavior and the elimination of existing life-controlling habits. Therefore, at Chad’s Hope Teen Challenge, residents must begin by embracing the 5 components of recovery:

Decision – Decide to get serious about recovery
Positive Peer Choice – Surround themselves with those who encourage recovery
Accountability – Accept responsibility for their actions and decisions
Boundaries – Understand the concept of, “No, I can no longer do that.”
Consistency - Recovery is for a lifetime

During the 12 month program, participants complete progressive phases of their recovery until they gain the skills and inner strength to fully re-enter society. Don’t forget. “Recovery lasts a lifetime,” but at the point of graduation from Chad’s Hope, a life now stands transformed for the better. Also, for every individual life transformed at Chad’s Hope, the lives of countless family members and friends are positively affected as well. Children have their fathers back. Mothers have their sons back. Marriages are saved and restored. God bless all who seek help for their addiction, and all those who strive to help them.

If you would like to help this recovery ministry, you can do so in several ways:

• Make a one-time or monthly tax deductible donation to the center
• Volunteer your time and your talents to the program
• Spread the word of hope
• Pray for the continued ministry of Chad’s Hope Teen Challenge

For more in depth information regarding Chad’s Hope and other Teen Challenge facilities, please visit the website www.teenchallengeky.com

History of Chad’s Teen Challenge of Eastern Kentucky

In 2002 a small group of concerned Christians began meeting on Saturday morning to pray about the drug problems in their county. After discussing solutions they decided to seek help from their county leaders. They attended a town hall meeting where they were able to speak to local judges, lawyers and political leaders. Everyone at the meeting agreed that the drug problems in Clay County was destroying the community and the lives of families that live there. At this time they estimated 1 death a month from drug related issues. That night the plans were given out to form a committee representing Christians and citizens who wanted to fight against drugs. These two groups eventually became known as Christians for a Drug Free Clay County.

An article about Eastern Kentucky drug problems was published in the Lexington Herald and was read by Congressman Hal Rogers. The article stated Eastern KY was the pain killer capital of the world. In disbelief Rogers began his own investigation and found it to be true. This information prompted Rogers and Karen Engle to form a task force which is known as Operation UNITE, Unlawful Narcotic Investigation, Treatment and Education. The task force was designed to target street level drug dealers by involving the community. The plan was for people to report any drug activity to authorities.

On May 2, 2004 the two teams had a drug march. Despite death threats and cold rainy weather, nearly 3500 people marched for a drug-free community. The march ended at the Rawlings and Stinson Park in Manchester about the time the storm ended. As Congressman Rogers and LT Governor Steve Pense were speaking a dark cloud hovered above them. Pense began to speak to the drug dealers and let them know that a dark cloud was hovering over their business and that Clay County would not tolerate their drug dealing any longer.

Christians for a Drug Free Clay County and Rogers knew everyone involved in drugs couldn’t be incarcerated. They knew they needed a treatment facility for those who had drug addictions. Christians for a Drug Free Clay County began seeking help on a drug treatment facility in Clay County. Many attempts were made to partner with others or to get funding for a faith based facility. A board, Visions of Eastern KY, was formed to seek out financial support for a facility.

Through the prayers and persistent help of political leaders, Christians for a Drug-Free Clay County was able to get grants for a facility. The construction would begin on land donated by Charley and Virginia McWhorter. This land would have been inherited by their son, Chad McWhorter, who died of a drug overdose in July 2004. Chad’s Dream was to build a house on this land where Charley had grown up. After Visions of Eastern KY heard about his dream, they agreed to name it Chad’s Hope.

Chad’s Hope Center opened in February 2008 and admitted its first student in March. Chad’s Hope Recovery Center can hold 52 residential students. In October 2008 Visions of Eastern Kentucky partnered with Teen Challenge USA. The 12 month program offers Christ-centered recovery and discipleship to all the students. Chad’s Hope Teen Challenge is committed to meet each students spiritual, physical and emotional needs through Jesus Christ the Lord.