TheTimesTribune.com, Corbin, KY

May 9, 2013

Singleton pleads guilty to complicity in wife’s murder, dismemberment


The Times-Tribune

CORBIN — By Sarah Hogsed / The Richmond Register

RICHMOND — Jason Singleton, the man accused in the killing and dismemberment of his wife in 2011, entered a guilty plea Tuesday morning to complicity to murder.

Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Jennifer Smith recommended that Singleton serve a total sentence of 30 years in prison.

Smith said the state “acknowledged” Singleton’s claim that Christina Marcum, the other defendant in the case, was the “hands-on” strangler of 24-year-old Angela Frazier-Singleton.

In his written statement, Singleton admitted he dismembered his wife’s body at his Deacon Hills home, and afterward he tried to cover it up. Police who later searched the home discovered that a large area of carpet and subfloor had been removed in one room, and a film of black soot covered the walls and ceiling, like something had been burning.

Frazier-Singleton’s dismembered body was found Jan. 19, 2011, in trash bags at the end of Tattler Branch Road in the Valley View community.

Singleton was arrested Jan. 20, 2011, after an armed standoff with police in Somerset during which he held four hostages at gunpoint. He later was sentenced to 10 years in prison for that incident.

On Tuesday, Singleton pleaded guilty in Madison Circuit Court to complicity to murder, two counts of tampering with physical evidence and misdemeanor abuse of a corpse.

The state’s recommendation is that Singleton serve 20 years on the murder count, five years each on the tampering charges and 12 months on the abuse of a corpse count.

All the felony charges should run concurrently for a total of 30 years, Smith said.

Singleton’s sentencing is set for 9 a.m. Aug. 23.

A new trial date has not been set in Marcum’s case yet, according to Commonwealth’s Attorney David Smith. Marcum and Singleton originally were co-defendants, but Judge William Clouse granted a motion to sever their cases.

After the hearing, Smith said that requiring Singleton’s testimony against Marcum at her trial was not a condition of the plea deal.

The circumstances of the case does not meet the requirements under state law for the use of the death penalty.

Singleton: Ex-girlfriend murdered his wife, urged him to cover-up crime

The Richmond Register staff report

RICHMOND — As part of his plea deal, Jason E. Singleton was required to make a statement detailing the crimes he committed. He did so in writing, the text of which appears below. Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Jennifer Smith said the state acknowledged Singleton’s statements but with the belief it was “his version” of what happened.

Commonwealth of Kentucky vs. Jason E. Singleton

Allocution


Come the defendant/affiant, Jason E. Singleton, and first being duly sworn, states and deposes as follows:

1. That I am the defendant in the above-referenced case.

2. That in the days leading up to January 16, 2011, conflicts arose between myself and Angela Frazier Singleton. Conflicts also arose between Angela Frazier Singleton and Christina Tompkins Marcum. During this period of time, Christina routinely threatened to kill or injure Angela Frazier Singleton.

3. On January 16, 2011, Angela came to our marital residence to retrieve personal property and refused to leave the premises. During this time, Angela ingested a large amount of Valium and was intoxicated to the point that she passed out. Christina Tompkins Marcum and I arrived during this period of time. When Angela woke up, she began arguing with Christina. Christina and Angela began fighting and I left the house and went to the back porch to smoke. I knew Christina presented a danger to Angela and knew that Christina had expressed her desire to injure or kill Angela, and in spite of that, I still left the residence. By leaving Angela unprotected in my home, I ignored my duty to protect her and manifested an extreme indifference to the value of human life by leaving Angela Frazier Singleton defenseless with the knowledge that Christina Tompkins Marcum would likely injure or kill Angela Frazier Singleton.

4. When I went back inside, Angela was dead. I checked her pulse and did CPR but I could not revive her. Christina Tompkins Marcum begged me to conceal the crime, telling me that I could not let her daughter grow up without a mother. I panicked and picked up Angela’s body and placed it in the trunk of her car. I then drove the car to Exit 108 off Interstate 75 and left her car in a parking lot. Christina was concerned that the body would be discovered with Christina’s boot print on her face and suggested that we sever the body parts and dispose of them in different trash dumpsters across the state. Shortly before and in increasing amounts after Angela’s death, I began to use large quantities of drugs, including but not limited to, Oxycontin, methamphetamine and detroamphetamine. In a series of what would be one bad decision after another, I retrieved Angela’s car which contained her body from Exit 108 and went to my house. I removed her body from the trunk, went inside and that’s where I committed the crime of abuse of a corpse by severing her body parts. I also committed the crime of tampering with physical evidence by removing, destroying, concealing and altering the body of Angela Frazier Singleton and other evidence including bodily fluids, flooring, clothing, and the implements I used to dismember Angela Frazier Singleton.

5. On or about January 19, 2011, I put Angela’s body parts in garbage bags and disposed of these garbage bags in a rural area in Madison County, Kentucky.

Jason Singleton (signature)

May 7, 2013